Caerphilly

Caerphilly

Originally produced in the South Wales town of the same name, Caerphilly has a recipe similar to those for other crumbly cheeses – Cheshire, young Lancashire and Wensleydale. Being close to the great mining towns of South Wales the young cheese was a firm favourite amongst mining communities as its shallow height and tough coat made it easy to eat with dirty hands down the mines whilst its salty, moist curd helped to replace the minerals lost during the hours spent labouring under ground. Its more mature variant – often kept for up to a year - formed its own tough coat and gradually became harder in texture and stronger in taste with age. There are few traditionally shaped Caerphilly cheeses made today, and only one producer in South Wales. Although South Caernarfon Creameries are now producing Caerphilly in North Wales most Caerphilly is made by the specialist crumbly cheese makers in Lancashire, Cheshire and Shropshire, generally in block form but sometimes in shallow wheels for supermarket pre-packs. This cheese tends to be young, fresh and clean tasting with a pleasant tang.